Super Size Me – New FDA Definitions

The Nutrition Facts label that we’ve all grow up with is finally getting a nutritional make over.  The U.S. Food and Drug Administration finalized an updated design for the nutrition facts label Friday, the first major overhaul in more than 20 years, to perhaps the biggest symbol used to measure a product’s healthfulness.

Michelle Obama announces a makeover for food nutrition labels in Washington on May 20. (Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press)

Michelle Obama announces a makeover for food nutrition labels in Washington on May 20. (Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press)

What this means to us…

  • About one-third of children and adolescents ages 6 to 19 are considered to be overweight or obese.
  • More than 1 in 6 children and adolescents ages 6 to 19 are considered to be obese.

The biggest change is a call out to added sugars, considered one of the largest contributing factors for childhood obesity, diabetes and adult on-set heart disease. They also update recommended portions and corresponding nutrition information to realistically reflect what Americans actually eat, not what they should eat. A serving size of ice cream will be two-thirds of a cup, not half a cup; soft drinks will go from eight ounces to 12 ounces. In other cases, serving sizes may get smaller.

USA Today

USA Today – Side by Side Comparison

The FDA says the rules better correspond with updated dietary guidelines and health research — for example, “calories from fat” will be eliminated because research shows the type of fat we’re eating, such as trans fat or saturated fat, is more important than how many calories come from fat.

Moving forward into a healthier America. Healthy Heart, Healthy Body, Healthy Mind…

 

resources:

LA Times – Jim Puzzanghere 03/20/16 – 10:53 am

USA Today – Hadley Malcolm 03/20/16 – 3:30 pm

Cheryl Fryar, M.S.P.H., and Cynthia Ogden, Ph.D., M.R.P., both of the National Center for Health Statistics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for reviewing this fact sheet